A chronic, deadly virus keeps killing Miami Beach residents

Over the last decade, the Global H7N9 pandemic avian flu virus, which was also known as SARS, has caused a total of 50 million case — or 6.7 percent of cases in the United…

A chronic, deadly virus keeps killing Miami Beach residents

Over the last decade, the Global H7N9 pandemic avian flu virus, which was also known as SARS, has caused a total of 50 million case — or 6.7 percent of cases in the United States.

Influenza viruses have at least five progeny, called hemagglutinin (HA) genes. Zika virus infected its virus family starting with a non-variant hemagglutinin gene. SARS and the virus carried by the H5N1 bird flu, which was first detected in 2003, also infected a non-variant hemagglutinin gene. A mutation happened in SARS, and this created a mutation in the vaccine, which caused it to contain a previously unknown protein — hemagglutinin 5(HA 5)— which can be detected by the discovery of a viral biomarker.

Two types of these viruses, H5N1 and H7N9, cause avian flu. HSV1 virus (the virus behind Zika virus) is found on human skin. As of September 2017, vaccines designed to fight against this virus appear to have been effective in preventing infection.

Additional investigation into a recent wave of deaths in Miami Beach may shed light on a type of flu that currently causes less global concern, but still has the potential to be more deadly than past strains. Miami Beach residents who were hospitalized with severe respiratory disease over a five-week period were all killed by HSV1 infections.

From HIV, to Ebola, to new flu viruses such as ASF, there have been a number of alarming viruses of late, but also tens of thousands of potentially fatal cases of H7N9.

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