Abortion-related deaths linked to poorer childhoods – study

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Utah lost nearly half of its children to death in 2011 compared to the national average Anti-abortion states are more likely to have poor outcomes for their children…

Abortion-related deaths linked to poorer childhoods - study

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Utah lost nearly half of its children to death in 2011 compared to the national average

Anti-abortion states are more likely to have poor outcomes for their children than the rest of the US, according to a new study.

States that voted in Republican candidates in the 2016 election have poorer childhoods for children compared to the rest of the country, according to the report by the Rudd Center at the University of Connecticut.

The study also found that the gap in these outcomes is at least as large or larger in 2017.

“Those who want to avoid these outcomes should want to make sure abortion is illegal,” the report authors wrote.

Since 1973, when the US Supreme Court officially legalized abortion nationwide, 4.5 million babies have been aborted.

These numbers have dropped significantly since the mid-80s – the study found that almost 900,000 fewer abortions are carried out each year today.

To determine the state level conditions for children, the study looked at some 300 indicators of childhood outcomes, including 15 of the most common causes of death.

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption The number of abortions performed each year has declined dramatically in the last 30 years

The researchers used data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Vital Statistics data to conduct the study, which was funded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

The most commonly linked cause of death was domestic violence, which comprised nearly a third of all child deaths.

Among the 15 leading causes of death that weren’t related to abortion, half of them were alcohol-related, the study found.

The second most common cause of death in children was accidents.

Georgia, North Carolina, Mississippi, and Texas all have the highest rates of drinking-related deaths, the study found.

The study says that the situation has largely worsened since the recession. It found that the death rate of children has risen by about 14% since 2008.

Read more: What if abortion was harder to get?

‘Not only murder, it’s child abuse’

However, the abortion rate has remained relatively flat since the 1980s.

The authors of the study say that when looking at the data, it’s clear these girls were dying from causes related to childhood.

“Applying these measurements to the data leaves a very clear picture: Abortion is related to more deaths for children than occurs with other risk factors, such as maltreatment and injury,” the study says.

It adds that while nearly 40% of all US children survived as stillborns in 2011, the same number of abortion-related deaths was 41%.

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption Where abortion is legal, child deaths are often related to child abuse, the study found

“Moreover, [the study] finds a clear causal relationship between parental child neglect and high infant mortality rates,” the study says.

It also noted that states in the South and West have more abortion clinics, which “can be expected to have an impact on overall abortion rates”.

But like the authors of the 2015 study, the researchers of this one say they would like to see more restrictions placed on the type of abortion that women can undergo.

“States that maintain legal abortion should implement policies that ensure women have access to a regulated health care service while limiting abortion access to those women and their physicians whose choice is acceptable to the women and their doctors,” the authors said.

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