Drought washes away famous California golf courses

The three-year drought in California has caused severe damage to golf courses. In fact, ESPN is reporting that drought restrictions for the oceanfront courses may be among the first passed in U.S. history, with…

Drought washes away famous California golf courses

The three-year drought in California has caused severe damage to golf courses. In fact, ESPN is reporting that drought restrictions for the oceanfront courses may be among the first passed in U.S. history, with Water Authority officials in Orange County (near Los Angeles) acknowledging that water conservation has been so strict, they may have to begin to ration it. The drought forced Open Links at Sonoma, one of the region’s most popular courses, to shut down after authorities destroyed more than 200 species of trees and restored the ecosystem to its former pristine condition, including sequoias.

According to officials, many local golf courses are currently operating in the red with many of them depending on major local benefactors to cover their costs. Sea-level rise and more intense storms – including the tsunami wave of 2011 – have already caused golf courses to shift to stronger drainage systems and clearer water lines. According to ESPN, Pacific Dunes Golf Club in Santa Cruz, Costa Rica, constructed a 25-foot-wide runway, which is said to be 10 times larger than Las Damas beach resort in the Dominican Republic.

Golf courses have long been positioned as victims of drought but they’re also facing a loss of player interest because of increasingly busy schedules, according to the National Golf Foundation. According to 2016 statistics, golf courses are losing more than $13.7 million annually across the U.S. So even when drought does cease to be an issue, the game of golf might not have the will or the capital to survive on its own.

Read the full story at CNN.

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