‘Facial recognition crime’: why it’s more likely to find the perpetrator than convict him

Written by Staff Writer “Joggers” are trying to defend themselves from attacks and police are trying to catch them on CCTV cameras. But according to a joint report by South Korea’s Justice Ministry and…

‘Facial recognition crime’: why it’s more likely to find the perpetrator than convict him

Written by Staff Writer

“Joggers” are trying to defend themselves from attacks and police are trying to catch them on CCTV cameras.

But according to a joint report by South Korea’s Justice Ministry and National Forensic Service, there’s a mathematical problem on the horizon — how to prove who’s the perpetrator.

In a series of violent crimes in Hwaseong City, Gangwon Province, between January and December last year, CCTV footage showed a street sweeper looking frightened when he was attacked by a stranger armed with a machete.

The attacker failed to steal from the sweeper but fled the scene. CCTV footage showed the attacker was wearing a scarf which obscured his face, something that was already a common trend of those using smart security cameras to cover up their faces.

“We expect most cases of ‘crimes of mobility’ to be solved through facial recognition technology,” said an official from the ministry, who declined to be named, according to the Yonhap News Agency.

“In the coming stage, our aim is to promote artificial intelligence technologies for face recognition software systems and mathematical modeling for mathematical identification prediction methods of suspects,” he added.

The “crime of mobility” isn’t a new phenomenon. The number of such attacks is rising, and remains a common problem for the public.

In March, a computer science student was attacked by a close associate, identified only as JH, who asked to practice a form of puppetry with the student.

A month later, a schoolteacher was attacked by a man who saw her walking with her husband.

Hwang Hwoo, a professor at Sungkyunkwan University, said in an interview with CBC that the use of biometric technology can help solve crimes, but warned that in those cases, the security footage of the attacker should be released to the public in order to catch the culprit.

What are smart meters?

In another recent incident, a Hong Kong apartment block shot back at their overzealous tenant.

In August last year, residents on the 19th floor of a shopping complex in Hong Kong decided to hire a security camera company to install cameras on their doorstep.

After shooting a video of their busy street on July 4, two days later, the landlord received an anonymous death threat to tear down the surveillance cameras.

Cameras located on the 21st floor of the shopping center were blamed for watching the whole road at one-way intervals, making it difficult for drivers to go straight. Residents who were in the supermarket at the time of the deadly brawl would also have seen the restaurant area on the other side of the street turned into a traffic jam.

The guard hired by the residents has been installed on the 69th floor of the complex, where he once terrorized other residents.

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