Parkinson’s: Pfizer says new treatment for disease works

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption One trial found that the drug did work better than placebo A pharmaceutical company says it has found a new treatment for patients with Parkinson’s disease who receive…

Parkinson's: Pfizer says new treatment for disease works

Image copyright Getty Images Image caption One trial found that the drug did work better than placebo

A pharmaceutical company says it has found a new treatment for patients with Parkinson’s disease who receive the drug Lyrica.

Pfizer said a study of its drug Sprycel in patients with Parkinson’s disease had shown that it worked better than placebo.

It’s also the first drug to show a benefit against the disease.

Parkinson’s disease is a neurodegenerative condition, which causes a tremor in the hands, arms, legs, trunk and face.

It is inherited, but symptoms do not appear in childhood.

Pfizer said that the study of 500 Parkinson’s disease patients showed that for patients receiving Sprycel, their tremor severity dropped by an average of 29%.

They also showed improvements in sleep and depression.

The drug has been on the market since 1998 for epilepsy, particularly in young patients with one type of epilepsy known as Dravet syndrome.

Disruption of the “endothelin” receptors at the primary nerve cell (pion) level is thought to trigger the tremor symptoms of Parkinson’s.

The main symptoms of Parkinson’s include the tremor which people with the disease may experience; a rapid or erratic speech rate; rigidity of the limbs; lack of voluntary action; difficulty walking; and dyskinesia, which is described as a motor impairment linked to involuntary movements that affect movement.

Pfizer said this was the second positive study showing Sprycel improved the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease.

A study of 1,000 Parkinson’s patients also found that it was more effective than a placebo, albeit not as effective as Lyrica.

The company said that early results from a trial in children with the disease suggested the drug helped a greater proportion of children with Parkinson’s symptoms than in adults.

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